1. Hi Tori! love your blog. I have had irregulur periods in the past. My last one was January 6th. I took a pregnancy test on Feb 13th and I’m pregnant! YAY! My husband and I are very excited. I made an apt with my midwife and she said I was about 8 weeks along. We did a ultrasound and she said it’s a little early to see anything – we did however see something she called a sac. I am not fearful but I would like some reassurance. Is there a way that I could be under 8 weeks and that’s why we only saw a sac? My next apt is March 17th. I will have an ultrasound then.. but the wait is hard!

  2. Hi Tori,
    I am 35 weeks pregnant and I think I may be losing my mucus plug. I have seen a little bloody discharge — not much but it looks like a string of snot. Is that my mucus plug? What should I do?

    • Josie,

      It does sound as though it certainly could be your mucous plug passing. You are about 5 weeks early so you should alert your care provider right away. He or she will ask you if you have been feeling any contractions or cramping and will very likely want to see you.

      37 weeks (or 3 weeks before your due date) is really the earliest we like babies to be born. Prior to that their lung development may not be complete and they have not completed their growing. This can result in a longer hospital stay for the baby and some prematurity problems. Please let me know how things are going.

  3. Hi Tori,
    I’m 11 weeks pregnant and experiencing less vaginal discharge. Should I be concerned?

  4. A friend of mine told me that I should check into having a midwife at my baby’s birth. I don’t really understand what they do. Are they better than doctors? Can you explain?

    • Midwives care for healthy women who have low-risk pregnancies and uncomplicated deliveries. The philosophy of midwifery is to encourage as natural a labor as possible and to provide continuous support for the laboring woman. Besides typically being present for a longer period during labor than a physician would be, midwives favor low medical intervention. In the hospital, however, they support a women’s choice to have epidural anesthesia, and they use other interventions or bring in an obstetrician when necessary.

      Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) frequently share a practice with one or more physicians and consult with them as needed. Having your care provided by a CNM may be more affordable than using a physician. Whether a midwife would be better for you, though, may depend on the level of care you need. In many countries, midwives manage most normal births and leave cesarean or complicated births to their physician colleagues.

      Whether to use a physician or midwife is a personal decision. I encourage you to make the choice that feels right for you.

  5. I am Rh negative and the baby’s father is Rh positive, can I wait and take the Rh immune globulin at 31 weeks instead of 28 weeks?

    My next appointment with my care provider is at 31 weeks.

    Please help me.
    Thanks

  6. What is the difference between a double footling breech and a complete breech? Our Nicholas has been described as being in both positions.

    • A breech baby is positioned buttocks-down rather than head-down in the uterus. The type of breech depends on where the baby’s legs are. Let me explain the variations: Complete breech. The baby is in a sitting position, with his legs crossed. Frank breech. The baby’s legs are straight up, folded flat against his face. His arms may be around the legs. Footling breech. One leg is fully extended; the other is folded under. Double footling breech. Both legs are fully extended. Another unusual position is transverse. In this case, the baby lies horizontally, across the uterus. Babies move around a great deal in the uterus and are likely to be in many positions over the course of a pregnancy. Your baby could have been in a complete breech position at one time and could have extended a leg into a footling position at another time.

  7. Hi Tori,
    been reading all your answers to the ladies and gents and i find it very reassuring. I am 11 weeks pregnant after 16 years of trying. I saw the doctor a week ago for an ultrasound or scan and every thing was ok with the baby. two days after i started to feel some itching and i discovered that i contracted yeast infection, i have no discharge or any unppleseant smell. I applied canasten cream just outside the vagina and the itching immediately stopped. can this harm the baby? The other worry i have is this; since the week 6 i have been having very strong symptoms such as nausea and vomiting as well as fatigue but all it seems to have suddenly stopped and, i do not feel any activity going on on my tummy, should i worry? Is this the right time that i should be feeling the baby’s moviment? please advise

    All the best

    B

  8. I went in 4 a regular check up 29 wks preg. Found I was in pree term labor this is my second child. I delivered my 1st @ 34wks n had an emergency c sectionn because of a placenta abruption. I am now 31 weeks the doc. Gave me steroid shots to devlope baby lungs and pills to stop the contractions. My contractions r back every 10 min but I’m still only dialated to 1. I am home on bbed rest. I am exhaused and sick of beig so uncomfortable we were planning a csection any way but how long do I have to b so miserable?

  9. M

    i have glaucoma and other issues with my cornea and am on several eye drops for each problem. when i ask my doctors if its safe for me to continue taking these medicines while pregnant my eye doctors tell me to ask my obgyn and my obgyn tells me to ask my eye doctors. the most concrete answer i’ve gotten is that if the mother needs this medicine to stay healthy then you must continue taking it. what i’d like to know is (1) what any potential birth defects might occur while i’m on all these eye drops and (2) does having glaucoma have any potential danger in giving birth naturally?

    thansks!

  10. Everything I read about pregnancy says that women often experience lightening in their first pregnancies but not in subsequent pregnancies, but no one ever explains why this is. It seems more logical to me that this would be reversed, since a woman’s muscles, ligaments, etc. would be stronger in her first pregnancy than in subsequent pregnancies. Can you explain this to me?

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About Tori Kropp

Tori Kropp

Known as "the Dear Abby of pregnancy," Tori has been interviewed on national television and radio and in national print publications, including CNN, The Wall Street Journal, New York Post, Washington Times, Atlanta Journal Constitution and Chicago Sun-Times.

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